In June 2008 whilst driving along the north of Scotland (with clubs in the boot) I came across Durness Golf Club which had a sign saying that it was the most northerly on the British mainland. I played the course, a delightful 18 tee nine-hole challenge with not a tree in sight.

This got me thinking, and I wondered where the most easterly, southerly and westerly courses would be. A visit on Google quickly delivered Gorleston, just south of Great Yarmouth – their website stating that it was the most easterly. A visit was arranged for October and a round played along the clifftop overlooking the North Sea.

The next was also an easy Google find with Mullion proclaiming it to be Britain’s most southerly golf course. In April this year I played golf in Cornwall for the first time and visited this charming course. It had been in my mind that I would also find the most westerly down there close to Land’s End.

However, before setting off I decided to check Google Maps and to my surprise found that the most westerly was in fact in Scotland, Traigh, just south of Mallaig. So in August it was back up to Scotland again to play this course with the most stunning views of the Inner Hebrides islands.

Some 3,000 miles later (from my London home) what conclusions can I draw on playing the four compass points of mainland Great Britain. Well, there was one constant – wind, wind and wind, as a ‘softie parkland player’ I have utter admiration for those club members that play their golf totally exposed to the elements.

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