After being handed the media specification sheet for Cobra’s new L5V driver, I could hardly have been forgiven for misreading the very prominent words hitting my eyes on the opening page: SCIENTIFICALLY ENGINEERED FOR INSANELY LONG, STRAIGHT DRIVES. Not a selling point any aspiring golfer can afford to ignore.

>>Cobra L5V driver video review

>>Cobra L5V driver photos

>>Cobra L5V driver launched

>>Cobra L5V driver review

And so with a custom-fitting session booked in at Cobra’s Brampton HQ, it was time to see if this new weapon carried the armoury to back up its manufacturer’s claims. For sake of time, I can tell you now that Cobra isn’t messing around here – and if you are in the market for a new gun, then the L5V should be given some serious attention.

Armed with what Cobra claims to be the largest clubface in golf, the L5V offers genuine forgiveness off the tee, perfect for those players who, like my good self and an 18-handicapper, struggle to find consistency when shooting from the blocks. The carbon composite crown and sole inserts are not only ultra-lightweight, but are designed to provide high MOI (moment of inertia) and high launch, as well as optimal spin.

But the L5V’s unique selling point undoubtedly comes via the club’s adjustable flight technology, which allows you to change the ball flight settings from “Standard Flight” to an “Increased Draw-Biased Flight”. If you’re struggling to comprehend such a thought, it works simply by inserting a torque wrench (every L5V comes equipped with one of these) into a hosel screw port and changing the setting from 0 (standard) to 1 (draw-biased) – it also allows you to change the club’s shaft, of which Cobra say there are 30 available custon-fit options. This all adds to the very personal touch created with the L5V.

So, with the technological jargon finally put to one side, now was my chance to find a driver that was not only fitted to work in tandem with my set-up and swing, but also one that I could adjust in future as my own game progressed (apart from mid-round, of course).

At address, the large clubface was a good starting point; standing over the ball I had more confidence than with my current driver, which is a Cobra LD (stiff shaft with 9.5 degree loft). But with my downfall for some time being a fierce left-to-right shape off the tee, it was hardly rocket science that I would be fitted to the L5V’s Draw-Biased setting (stiff shaft, 9.5 degrees).

The result was indeed straighter and more consistent drives, while my average distance was considerably up from around 240yds to around 265. Looks wise, Cobra has not gone overboard. The only negative point would be the design writing on the shaft, which just looks slightly messy and all-too eye-catching when changed to the draw-biased setting. That aside, it’s good to go, and will certainly find a warm and welcome home in the Narey bag for some time.

>>Cobra L5V driver video review

>>Cobra L5V driver photos

>>Cobra L5V driver launched

>>Cobra L5V driver review