Here you can read the Golf Monthly Motocaddy M3 PRO trolley review, including the pros and cons of this electric trolley

Product Overview

Overall rating:

Motocaddy M3 Pro

Pros:

  • If you struggle to fit your electric trolley into the boot of your car with your clubs, or have limited space at home, then Motocaddy’s M-Series of trolleys is a great choice, thanks to their compact size when folded. While the M1 is a stripped-back offering, the M3 will catch the eye of gadget fans, thanks to the digital display. The central built-in GPS device holder with a USB charging point is a particularly neat touch. The new EASILOCK bag attachment system is a small but excellent addition.

Cons:

  • The trolley is compact when folded, but the folding system is more complicated than the QUIKFOLD design on the Motocaddy S-Series models. This folding design doesn’t take long to master, but is more fiddly to erect than the S designs. Some golfers won’t make use of the extras that feature here, and not on the M1 PRO model.

Product:

Motocaddy M3 PRO trolley review

Manufacturer:

Price as reviewed:

£450.00

Key Technology: Motocaddy M3 PRO trolley review

The M3 PRO is 40 per cent smaller than its S-Series counterparts when folded, but it still provides a host of features seen on the S3 PRO model. These include a five-minute ‘lost ball’ timer and a full-colour digital screen with multiple distance readings. The trolley also features the EASILOCK system, designed to lock the cart bag on to the trolley, removing the need for a lower strap.

 

Verdict

Motocaddy has improved what was an almost flawless design. It might take longer to put up and down than some, but this is well worth it for the size it folds down to. It runs smoothly and is easy to control on all types of ground. The frame is modern and stylish with a standout overall look.

  • Alastair Lack

    One or two odd things. I have the lead acid battery, and I am supposed to remember to take it off charge the day after putting it on, and if I forget I could damage the battery. Why on earth not put the necessary electronics into the charger to do it for me? I just left my old Powacaddy on till the next time I used it (usually a week later), when I disconnected and off I went.
    Then the pin code. I get everything out of the car, connect up and enter the pin to allow me to go over to the clubhouse to meet my partners for coffee. To lock the pin, I have to burrow down behind the bag to the battery and unplug it for a few seconds before plugging it back in to lock the pin again. There’s all sorts of gizmos in the electronic screen but not a facility to immobilise the trolley. An odd oversight.
    But it’s a good solid trolley, well made, and should I hope last me some while.