It is the best stroke in the modern game but how does it work? Here is Jordan Spieth's incredible putting technique... Revealed!

If you are looking for a textbook illustration for how to stand to a golf ball with a putter in your hand, Jordan Spieth is your man. This is the cornerstone of Jordan Spieth’s incredible putting technique. He is perfectly square with his feet alignment matching his clubface. The ball is a fraction ahead of centre in his stance and this helps him strike the ball slightly on the upswing, to get the ball rolling sooner. The last point to notice is that his eyes are a fraction inside the ball-to-target line and that allows him to create a very gentle inside arc to his stroke in the backswing. He’s not trying to manipulate the head and create a straight back and through stroke – instead, it is all very natural movement.

Putting Tips Videos

Spieth uses a left below right grip and this helps set your shoulders square at address. With right below left, the tendency is often to open the shoulders a fraction and that can cause you to cut across the ball through impact. Not a problem for Spieth.

Long Putting Tips Videos

The momentum in his stroke comes from a very gentle rotation of his body. His arms respond to that rotation, working in harmony. By relying on his stronger core muscles (and not the smaller, faster ones in his arms), his stroke is incredibly consistent.

Rory McIlroy Putting Drills

Perhaps the most impressive part of Jordan Spieth’s incredible putting technique is the transition from backswing to through swing. It is smooth, unhurried and crucially there is a very small amount of lag in his wrists. This shows that his grip pressure is light allowing him to feel the flow in his stroke.

Short Putting Tips Videos

Again the release is textbook, revealing rhythm and flow. You want a gentle acceleration through the ball and a good release is usually a sure sign you’ve done that. A lot of amateurs hold the face to the target through impact for longer, almost trying to steer the ball towards its target but that kills the all-important rhythm in your stroke. His follow-through is a fraction longer than his backswing as he strokes, not forces the ball towards its target.