The new Masters tradition has been established and doing the establishing was Blubber Watson.
 
Last time Watson was in the interview room here was 51 weeks and two days ago when, as the new champion, he broke down and cried while trying to explain what it meant to him to have a Green Jacket to go with the General Lee. Properly cried too, big, sobbing yelps that meant the media reacted the only way we could…we laughed at the big, soft girl’s blouse. Quite sweet though.
 
So now he comes in again to chat with us, this time as the defending champ of course. Third question in came the deal-breaker question. What, asked someone, did you do when you got the Green Jacket home. Anything crazy?
 
Well, no, not really. Turns out that all Blubber did with the blazer was to gently wrap his baby boy in its contours. Actually this answer took about ten minutes to deliver because the good, old boy started crying again and had to force the odd word out through another small tornado of sobs and squelches. Once again we, the media, laughed. Well, come on, what else are we supposed to do – cry with him?
 
So the new Masters tradition is this…every time Watson comes in for an interview we are now vying to be the one to ask him the right slushy question to set him off again on one of his emotional roller-coasters.
 
Plus this two-interviews-two-sobbings routine is also a Masters record. We’ve had a few softies who have cried over this and that over the years but even Ben ‘Lend me a handkerchief please’ Crenshaw never cried two interviews in a row.
 
The new game at Augusta, by the way, is for fans to locate Blubber’s spot in the trees off the tenth fairway and there they mimic replaying that sensational banana recovery that effectively won him the Masters last year.
 
Playing a practice round this week Blubber saw two blokes standing in there and gazing at the scene. “Oi, it wasn’t there, it was a few yards over to the right, ” he yelled helpfully at them.
 
Then he looked closer at them and realised he had just been shouting at Billy Casper and his son. “Man, that was special. To have someone like Mr Casper pay attention to something I’d done was a real honour for me. One thing I know is that I will never try to replicate that shot again. Well, unless I’m in there again on Sunday in a play-0ff. Then I guess I’d give it a go.
 
“I’ve never had a lesson in my life so all I do is close my stance a bit, hook the face a little and then swing as hard as I can. It’s fairly easy for me to do.”
 
At which point I have to admit that I started to cry…