1)    Sitting on the bank at the 16th hole watching the players hit into the same sloping green where Tiger lobbed that miracle chip four years ago. The crowd are getting noisier by the day, and the bank, in my opinion, puts Henman’s Hill – or whatever they call it now, Murray’s Mound – to total shame. Also, you get to see the players hit skimmers across the water, which is amusing for some, embarrassing for others…

2)    Standing behind the ropes on the 12th tee. Yesterday was great, but today I could see and hear everything, from caddy advice to the sound of fat and thin contacts. As I wrote yesterday, there really is no margin for error on this hole and it looks even more daunting from the tee. I’d be happy just to get it on dry land…

3)    Watching the contrast in Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods at their respective press conferences. While Woods wasn’t exactly one-dimensional in his handling of the press, he remains happy to get the job done. His press conference spoke volumes for his standing in the game; there were hacks queuing out of the door. Mickelson, on the other hand, spoke to about a quarter of that number. Lefty was jovial and quick to smile on all accounts. Perhaps that’s the big difference between the two.

4)    Speaking with Geoff Ogilvy about his hopes for the Masters. The Australian is being talked up considerably round these parts, and rightly so. “I come to every tournament now with the belief that I can win. I know that after winning a Major, if I compete, I will be there competing at the weekend.” That’s good to hear, since I placed a cheeky ten bucks on the Aussie this morning…

5)    Listening to tales of Bill Elliott’s past. Our contributing editor is a bit of a legend at Augusta, and he has a story for everything – always worth listening to. Come to think of it, I haven’t seen him for a while… Probably sinking another drop of sauvignon blanc on the clubhouse veranda…

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