A guide to the tenth hole at Augusta National, including tips from two-time Masters champion and 32-time Masters competitor Bernhard Langer

Bernhard Langer Augusta National Course Guide: Hole 10

Augusta National Hole 10 – Par 4 – 495 yards

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18

The 10th marks the start of a treacherous run of holes, and is traditionally the hardest hole at Augusta National. Players will attempt to drive the ball in the left side of the fairway to make the green more accessible, but anything overworked – or hit too straight – will find trees. A 60 yard-long bunker lurks some way short of the green, and approaches need to be accurate to dissect the bunker and shrubbery to the right of the greed and a steep run-off area to the left.

Most players choose to use a 3-wood, or even a long iron, as the dramatically downhill-sloping fairway gives all balls a significant shunt forward, provided they land in the short grass.

Related: How Fast Are The Greens At The Masters?

Bernhard Langer Augusta National Course Guide: Hole 10

Bernhard Langer plays a shot on the tenth hole during the third round of the 2016 Masters

Langer: “This is another tee shot that demands a draw. The fairway falls to the left side and catching the slope means you can take more loft into the green. Problems from the left of the fairway often come from overhanging branches.”

Best ever score: 2
Worst ever score: 9

Related: The History Of The Masters Green Jacket

Memorable moment: In 2012, Bubba Watson pulled his drive way left during his play-off with Louis Oosthuizen. From a more-than fortuitous lie amongst trees and shrubbery, he bent a wedge almost 90 degrees – a shot that landed him his first major title. He would go on to win The Masters for the second time two years later.

Worst moment: Undoubtedly the most agonising moment on Camellia was the missed three-foot putt that cost Scott Hoch the green jacket in 1989.

On the first play-off hole, Hoch only needed to sink his putt from close range to ensure he took the accolades and left Nick Faldo with the commiserating pats on the back. Instead, he missed and allowed Faldo to claim his first Masters title on the next hole.