A guide to the twelfth hole at Augusta National, including tips from two-time Masters champion and 32-time Masters competitor Bernhard Langer

Bernhard Langer Augusta National Course Guide: Hole 12

Augusta National Hole 12 – Par 3 – 155 yards

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The 12th is arguably the most famous short-hole in golf. The green is only 20-feet deep and the wind is notoriously difficult to read. When the breeze is swirling, the water fronting the putting surface sees a lot of action, as does the pine straw through the back of the green; a chip back towards the water with a sand buffer is often seen as more preferable than a pitch from the drop zone. If you offered everyone in the field four pars at the 12th, not one player would turn you down.

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Bernhard Langer Augusta National Course Guide: Hole 12

Bernhard Langer plays out of the bunker on the 12th hole during the first round of the Masters on April 8, 2004

Langer: “The green is angled from front-left to back-right and so is Rae’s Creek. Due to Amen Corner’s swirling winds I agree with Jack Nicklaus, in playing over the bunker even though the landing area is only about nine yards deep.”

Best ever score: 1
Worst ever score: 13

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Memorable moment: The chance for Fred Couples to win the Masters in 1992 seemed to be rolling away with his ball as it trickled towards Rae’s Creek on the unforgiving 12th. The ball seemed destined for the water as it began its inevitable journey down the steep bank, only for something incredible to happen. Against all logic and expectation, the ball stopped, handing Couples, who led by three shots, an opportunity to chip to within a foot of the pin. The American went on to win his only major with the help of a hole that rarely shows such leniency.

Worst moment: All golfers know the perils of Golden Bell. If Tom Weiskopf had forgotten, his first round attempt to crack the par-3 in 1980 would leave an indelible reminder.

After his tee shot had come back off the green and found Rae’s Creek, Weiskopf sent his ball into the water another four times before eventually getting into a putting position. He departed with a 13; a score to humble even the most confident of golfers.