US Masters Recap 2010

Day 1:

The big story on day one was the return of Tiger Woods, playing his first tournament since revelations of off the course issues. Woods hit a first day 68, which left him tied for seventh at 4-under and was the first time he had ever hit a first round score in the 60’s at the Masters. At the end of the day Tiger was overshadowed by 60-year old Tom Watson and 50-year old Fred Couples, two Champions Tour players who shot first rounds of 67 and 66 respectively. Phil Mickelson, Lee Westwood and K.J. Choi all sat at 5-under one stroke behind the leader Couples.

Day 2:

Lee Westwood put in a strong performance on day two with a 3-under 69, becoming the co-leader with fellow Englishman Ian Poulter. Tom Watson and Fred Couples fell off slightly from day one with scores of 74 and 75. Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and K.J. Choi were amongst the pack tied for third at 6-under. Notables cut on day two included Luke Donald, 2000 winner Vijay Singh, 1988 winner Sandy Lyle and Larry Mize whose famous chip in a 1987 playoff beat Greg Norman.

Day 3:

Lee Westwood maintained his excellent form with a 4-under 68 on day three taking him to 12-under for the tournament. Phil Mickelson hit a dramatic eagle-eagle-birdie on thirteen, fourteen and fifteen which saw him record a 5-under 67 and claim second place at 11-under, three strokes from the rest of the field. K.J. Choi and Tiger Woods sat four strokes behind the leader at 8-under and co-leader on day two Ian Poulter fell to 6-under.

Day 4:

The big story of day four was 25-year old American Anthony Kim who shot a 7-under 65 charging up the leader board from 9th to 3rd. Lee Westwood, leader at the beginning of the day, saw erratic play spoil his chances of victory shooting a 1-under 71 and falling one spot to second place. Ultimately Kim and Westwood weren’t able to overtake eventual champion Phil Mickelson who shot a bogey free 5-under 67 to claim his third green jacket and first since 2006. His round included a second shot on 13 from behind a tree to the green that ingrained Mickelson’s place in Masters folklore.