The idea of a ‘Hogan fade’ may come as a surprise to those who have read that his natural ball flight was right to left, and indeed it was.

Hogan even won a Major early on moving the ball that way. But he thought he would enjoy more success and consistency hitting a fade, so set about adapting his set-up to help keep his arms and shoulders on a flatter plane.

He visualised a pane of glass he had to swing underneath, although that didn’t quite happen technically.

Then he really extended through the ball, holding off his arm rotation and actually clearing out of the way at impact, with his shoulders a little bit open.

The clubface was open to his shoulders too and he drew it across the ball, delofting it as well, which is why his long irons became a trademark shot.

You’ve got to be fearsomely strong in the left arm to swing this way, and he had to make sure his hands and arms were just right at impact.

But at the time, nobody practised as hard as Hogan, who spent hours on the range until these movements became natural to him.

Hogan fade

  • Adapted his set-up to help keep his arms and shoulders on a flatter plane.
  • Visualised a plane of glass he had to swing underneath, although that didn’t quite happen technically.
  • He really extending through the ball , holding off his arm rotation and clearing out of the way at impact, he was able to achieve a consistent left to right ball flight with his shoulders a little bit open as well.
  • The club face was open to his shoulders too. He would draw the club face across the ball, delofting it to hit trademark long irons.
  • Such a technique required him to be extremely strong in the left arm, as well as making sure his hands and arms were just right at impact.