Take a look at our list of the best golf courses in the county below.

The Best Golf Courses In Herefordshire

Sandwiched between Worcester and the rolling hills of Wales, Herefordshire provides some truly inspirational and stunning golf so bearing that in mind we have delved deep into the county to discuss our favourites.

From the lofty 18 holes at Kington to the glorious woodland of Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire is a county you should think about visiting on your next golf trip.

Related: Golf Monthly’s UK&I Top 100 Courses

Kington

The highest 18-hole course in England, Kington is approached by a steep, narrow lane which sets the pulse racing at the same time as making you fear for how heart-threateningly hilly it might be to play. Happily, this is not the case at all, and barring a couple of gentle climbs here and there, this bunkerless, linksy and most natural course runs along the top of, rather than up or down, Bradnor Hill. A problem with golf course reviews is that in the writer’s desire to recommend, there is often a tendency for overuse of superlatives and hyperbole.

For once, this is impossible to avoid because the views over the Brecon Beacons, the Black Mountains and Hergest Ridge, are breathtakingly good. No matter how you play, it would be hard to imagine anyone not enjoying every yard of the walk. Despite the lack of sand and its modest length, the course is protected by the need to approach its greens from exactly the right angle. From the uphill drive at the first where you need to stay right, to the tempting driveable par-4 closing hole, there is also great variety and the five short holes are particularly strong.

Leominster

Starting with an innocuous par-4, Leominster moved to its present location just before the Second World War and began to take shape as it sits today during the 1960’s. Originally, it was a nine-hole layout but was eventually extended to 18 in 1990. Not particularly long according to the yardages, these numbers can be immensely deceiving because of the sheer variety in terrain from highs to lows.

The three holes from the 6th to the 8th are known as their very own ‘Amen Corner’ with the par-3, 196 yard 6th being of particular difficulty. All in all, this is an enjoyable course that will test your game nicely.

The Herefordshire

Founded in 1896, The Herefordshire Golf Club has moved location several times before eventually shifting to its current site in 1932. Known as the Ravens Causeway, the site offers incredible views of the Brecon Beacons, Shropshire Hills and the Malverns so if visual pleasure is what you are after on the golf course, then The Herefordshire is the place for you.

In some circles it is described as the ‘Gleneagles of the Midlands’ and considering James Braid is the man responsible for its design, it comes as no surprise that the course has picked up that nickname.

In terms of signature holes, the eighth is an absolute monster. Measuring 460 yards off the back tees, this par-4 is a potential score-wrecker every time you play it. According to their website, where each hole has its own set of statistics, the eighth has been played 13,343 times and there have been only 57 birdies. Take a par and move on fast.

Burghill Valley

One of the youngest courses on our list, Burghill Valley was founded in 1991 just north of Hereford where you get occasional views of the stunning Brecon Beacons.

Nestled in lovely woodland, golf here is a truly enjoyable experience and the one hole that truly stood out more than others was the par-4 ninth. 400 yards off the whites, this hole bends itself around a small lake on the left which leaves a tricky approach shot into the green.

Ross-on-Wye

Designed by Ken Cotton and opened for play in 1967, the course at Ross on Wye is set across undulating terrain in the hills above the Wye Valley. It’s a tight, tree-lined layout featuring an abundance of wildlife, including the odd Muntjac deer. A blanket of daffodils and bluebells covers the woodland floor through the spring then there’s an amazing spectrum of colours as the leaves turn in the autumn.

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