Featuring the home of Lee Westwood, we take a look at the best courses Nottinghamshire has to offer.

The Best Golf Courses In Nottinghamshire

The county of Nottinghamshire may be small in comparison to others, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t any golf to enjoy there. Notts Golf Club is one of the finest in England and Worksop is also the home course of Lee Westwood. Below we have taken a look at seven of the best courses the county has to offer.

Related: Golf Monthly UK&I Top 100 Courses

The Best Golf Courses In Nottinghamshire

Notts

A view of the 18th hole at notts (Getty Images)

This larger-than-life, sprawling, undulating heathland/woodland mixture is set in a truly tranquil setting. It is big in scale, majestic from start to finish, covering a vast acreage which gives the golfer a real feeling of freedom and space, without being too tiring on the legs.

It’s all systems go from the start, as the first few holes all invite a big drive, and the course then heads through a more tree-lined section before the 11th takes you up onto higher ground. The glorious long par-3 13th, played from a wonderfully elevated tee, often calls for a wood, and the closing hole back down to the clubhouse is a real challenge.

Coxmoor

The current layout at Coxmoor – which celebrated its centenary in 2013 – was developed in the 1930s, at which point there were no trees on the site. Since then, birch, beech and pine have helped to define the design and the course now stretches to more than 6,700 yards from the championship tees. There are five par 5s which raise the prospect of birdies, but the elevated location means that wind can often play a significant role. With Hollinwell and Sherwood Forest located nearby, Coxmoor can very justifiably hold its head high.

Ramsdale 

The Hawtree golf architecture dynasty dates back to 1912 and the undulating, parkland Seely course was designed by the company a quarter of a century ago. Since then, it has gained a reputation as a welcoming club with a course that is very playable and great value for money. The front nine of this par-71 layout works its way through mature trees, while the second half heads up onto higher ground, the reward for which is fine views and some downhill shots as you return to the clubhouse.

Worksop

With its sandy soil and excellent drainage, this gently rolling course offers top quality golf throughout the year. In places quite narrow and with its fair share of dogleg holes, there are also places where you can let loose from the tee. The par-3 closing hole will unnerve those who slice as they may well end up back in the clubhouse rather sooner than they want to be there. Lee Westwood learnt his game at Worksop and remains a life-long fan

Sherwood Forest 

Sherwood Forest to the east of Mansfield has long been one of Nottinghamshire’s premier clubs, but in recent year’s this fine Harry Colt heathland layout, later refined by James Braid, has been catching a far wider eye.

It plays over rolling and very attractive heathland, and boasts a very good mix of holes; some of which require plenty of thought while others need a little more brute force.

The stretch of consecutive holes from 11 to 14 is probably as tough a par-4 run as you’ll face anywhere, especially into the breeze. Indeed, the consensus is that you will usually need to make your score heading out here, and then fight over the back nine to protect any gains.

The course can stretch to nearly 6,900 yards if so desired and beyond that its main defences are the swathes of heather that flank, and sometimes cross, the holes, and 94 bunkers presented in a way that perfectly complements the heathland terrain.

Wollaton Park

First opened in 1927 with a match between course designer Tom Williamson, Ernest Whitcombe, JH Taylor and Harry Vardon, Wollaton Golf Club is a lovely parkland layout.

With Wollaton Hall imposing itself on many of the holes, the course is set in mature woodland and offers plenty of scoring opportunities especially on the par-5s; the 4th, 9th, 10th and 15th. However be wary of getting overconfident with the driver.

Newark

(Sent from Simon Collingwood, General Manager of club)

Newark Golf Club was founded in 1901 and was originally a 9-hole track before Tom Williamson made significant changes. He was then consulted again in 1934 when the club moved to its current site.

In terms of holes to look out for, the par-4 fourth is probably the first significant challenge with a drive over water. At 459 yards off the whites, it will take two swift hits to get it there, so if you’re lucky enough to write four on the scorecard after playing this hole, take it with both hands.

14 is another hole that relies on solid placement. A sharp dogleg, the tee shot requires roughly a 240-yard drive before you turn left towards the green. Out of bounds lurks left so be accurate here.

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