Knowing how to personalise golf balls can help you stand out from the crowd. There are several ways, from the humble Sharpie to more elaborate measures

How To Personalise Golf Balls

You might be a beginner looking for inexpensive golf balls or a veteran of many years playing the best balls on your market. Either way, there’s nothing to stop you adding your own personal touch before setting off round the course.

Not that many years ago your local pro probably stocked club-crested golf balls, but not a lot else went on in the way of personalisation.

Some golfers may even remember using a tee peg to put a series of fine indents in the surface of the old balata balls. How times have changed!

When it comes to how to personalise golf balls, it depends how particular you are, and how much effort you’re prepared to go to.

How To Personalise Golf Balls

There is no obligation to go to all this effort to personalise your golf balls!

But you probably won’t be surprised to learn that in the 21st century you can have pretty much whatever you want emblazoned on your golf balls. That means initials, names, a logo or crest or even a photo of yourself or your loved ones

How To Personalise Golf Balls

The Sharpie pen

Let’s start with the simplest option – the trusty Sharpie pen. This has become the staple ball-marking tool for millions of golfers the world over.

Okay, it may be more for identification than personalisation purposes, but Titleist has made a big thing over the years of how its tour pros mark their golf balls.

Some golfers are simple one-dot merchants. Others opt for a combination of colours. Yet others create something so elaborate you wonder how they would cope if they were losing balls with alarming regularity.

How To Personalise Golf Balls

The Sharpie is the simplest method – now available in a vast range of colours

Sharpies are virtually permanent. They may wear over time, especially on wet days, but that will only be an issue if your ball is into its third or fourth outing. And you can always top the markings back up.

The MyBall marking tool, among others, lets you neatly draw playing card, canine or 19th hole symbols with a Sharpie.

How To Personalise Golf Balls

MYball lets you neatly draw a selection of symbols using your Sharpie

And Sharpies are now available in a vast rainbow of colours so you’ll be able to find the precise shade you want.

Ready made

At least two brands offer balls with fairly elaborate pre-printed markings. Callaway has the  Triple Track Alignment system on its ERC Soft and Chrome Soft models. TaylorMade has its Pix balls available in the TP5 and TP5x.

US Buy Now at Worldwide Golf Shops for $44.99

UK Buy Now at American Golf for £39.99

How To Personalise Golf Balls

Let TaylorMade do the fancy design work for you with the TP5x Pix

If you’re confident that no-one else you play with is likely to be playing them, why not let Messrs Callaway and TaylorMade do the job for you?

They’re designed to help you too. Callaway’s Triple Track offers improved alignment. TaylorMade’s Pix helps you better see how your ball is rolling on the greens.

Transfers or tattoos

Another option for those wondering how to personalise golf balls is to add a transfer or tattoo. Several companies offer products along these lines.

How To Personalise Golf Balls

Golf Dotz transfers are another easy way to add the personal touch

Among them are Golf Dotz from whom you can get two sheets of transfers for about a fiver in a range of designs. They’re thin and durable and permanently bond to the skin of the golf ball in under five seconds.

Special order

It used to be that only the club pro could offer personalised or logo golf balls. Now, you can do it yourself with several companies.

Titleist, for example, offers three ways to personalise balls across the whole Titleist range.

You can choose a custom number (£3 surcharge per dozen – up to the number 99 in some models, more limited in others).

You can draft up to three lines of 17-character text (£4 surcharge per dozen).

And you can choose from a selection of flags, emojis and other symbols (£4 surcharge per dozen).

So less than £1 more per ball to make your Titleist totally and unmistakably yours!

How To Personalise Golf Balls

Titleist golf balls can be personalised in three different ways

TaylorMade’s programme is a little more limited, but for an extra £3 a dozen on its TP5 models you can choose from a small selection of football club logos. Or you can add either three lines of 12-character text or one of a selection of novelty logos.

Vice Golf offers a comprehensive personalisation service called My Own Vice. This offers the chance to print text, logos or even photos on your golf balls for 49p extra per ball. Minimum order is one dozen, but the price drops significantly for larger quantities

Fancy adding a photo of yourself or your kids? You can with Vice Golf’s My Own Vice programme

Line marking tools

Many of us now like to ensure we have the ball perfectly lined up on putts (and even tee-shots), with a number of helpful tools hitting the market.

Among them are the Trident Align and Align-M-Up, which help you to draw perfectly straight lines.

Draw perfect lines with the Align M Up

We’ve probably all found balls that have no end of markings criss-crossing them. Whether you want one simple line or a cross-hatching effect, these devices let you personalise your ball while also helping with alignment.

A splash of colour

Okay, this may not be going down the full personalisation route. But golf balls are now available in such a wide range of colours that you could semi-personalise your ball just by playing a stand-out trademark colour.

The Volvik Vivid in sky blue or purple perhaps? Titleist’s TruFeel in matte red maybe?

A rainbow of coloured options in Volvik’s Vivid golf ball

Once word gets around that you’re the purple golf ball girl or guy, surely no-one would dare tread on your toes by choosing the same colour when playing with you. A degree of personalisation at zero extra cost.

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