In simple terms, a hybrid is a cross between a fairway wood and an iron, delivering both the forgiveness long irons lack and the control that fairway woods can’t offer. Last year over 50% of tour professionals played a hybrid, and an increasing number of amateurs are now joining them, turning to a club that can make those awkward 160-220 yard shots that little bit easier.

Hybrid buyers guide

Iron or fairway replacement?

The first thing you should consider is what you want your hybrid to do. Are you looking for more control than your 3-iron currently provides to find greens on long par 3s and par 4s, or are you looking to breach the gap between your fairway and current long iron set-up for more accuracy and options off the tee? If you are looking to replace a long iron then the added forgiveness and versatility of a hybrid will come as a welcome addition. If you are happy with your ball striking, but could do with an option that better suits the gap between your longest iron and shortest wood then a hybrid is also useful. They have the same smooth sole for sweeping strikes of the deck as a fairway wood, while the lofts often go as low as 15°, providing lots of options for your gapping requirements.

Loft
The loft you need will mostly be decided by what you want your hybrid to do. If you are looking to replace a 3-iron, for example, you’ll want to look at hybrids with lofts between 20-24°. However, if you are looking for a more controllable alternative to your fairway then you should consider something lower; 15° will traditionally replace a 3-wood, while 17° is the normally a 5-wood.

Try before you buy

A club’s shaft length can affect the overall distance as much as the loft. Some players will also find they hit hybrids further than irons with the same lofts due to the increased quality of strike, so if you are trying to reduce your gapping it can be especially important to try a few side by side.

Adjustability
If you’re not quite sure what you want your hybrid for, but know you could benefit from an easier-to-hit option, then choosing one with an adjustable element could be the answer. Adjustability can also be extremely useful if you play lots of different courses or in changing wind conditions.

Design
Another factor you may consider is the club’s design. With a range of bright colours hitting the market, the choice here will mostly come down to what inspires the most confidence in your game. The shape of the clubhead will also affect this. Some hybrids are more like fairway woods to advance the ball, while some are more compact and suited to approach shots.

This Month’s Best Hybrid Deals

Mizuno JPX900 Hybrid at Amazon.com | Was $249 | Now $179

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Showing reviews 61–80 of 115

The internal weighting design moves the centre of gravity lower and further back. The lofts however are 1˚ stronger and this combination creates a flight that is both high and…

£140.00

The Snake Eyes Quick Strike QS4 hybrid has four perimeter weight ports, which help to improve MOI. Features a concave sole design for less drag. This hybrid would suit golfers…

£96.00

The Nike Susquatch Sumo hybrid has a lightweight Cryo steel face, which helps maximise distance and forgiveness right across the face. This hybrid would suit golfers who prefer a more…

£130.00

The Mizuno MX Fli Hi hybrid has a sweetspot that is positioned n the centre/toe end of the club where most amateur mishits occur. This hybrid would suit golfers who…

£75.00

The Nicklaus Claw hybrid has a sole design, which reduces club to ground contact at impact to lower drag and create more efficient energy transfer. This hybrid would suit golfers…

£79.00

The Ram Tour Grind X hybrid has a neat, new head design with weight deep in the head, which promises a combination of playability and forgiveness. This hybrid would suit…

£60.00

The John Letters T-Series hybrid has a low-profile head, which boasts heel/toe weighting system to offer high ball flight, low spin and maximum distance. This club would suit golfers who…

£60.00

The Benross VT Xtreme Escape hybrid has a shallow-faced, stainless steel head with thin crown technology and a contoured sole to cut through the turf. This hybrid would suit golfers…

£60.00

The Callaway FT hybrid is created with Fusion Technology, which merges a steel head with a tungsten-loaded sole plate for high launch and control. This hybrid would suit golfers who…

£159.00

The Cleveland Launcher hybrid has a horseshoe-shaped perimeter sole weighting, which generates a very high MOI and mid-trajectory ball flight. This hybrid would suit golfers who want an extra-large, forgiving…

£109.00

The Bridgestone J36 hybrid has internal weighting, which increases MOI for twist-resistance. Leading edge designed to make clean contact easier. This hybrid would suit golfers who want forgiveness and scope…

£119.00

The Cleveland Hibore XLS hybrid has an inverted crown, which lowers and deepens centre of gravity for high flight. Extra offset helps square the face at impact. This hybrid would…

£89.00

The Vega RAF-U hybrid features a bulked-up iron head designed to get the ball up easily from the tightest of lies with a penetrating flight. This utility club should suit…

£149.00

The ‘Dual Runner Sole’ that was successfully introduced to Callaway’s FT hybrids has been added to a larger head in the form of the Diablo to provide more stability and…

£129.00

A titanium crown accounts for just 2.6% of the overall head weight, so more weight can be focused low and deep in the head, to generate a higher launch and…

£99.00

The size, shape, offset and centre of gravity location changes slightly depending on the loft of the hybrid. This helps to produce distinct ball flight, workability and trajectory differences. A…

£150.00

Mizuno MX-700 utility review. Golf Monthly reviews the Mizuno MX-700 utility.

£109.00