In this piece we take a look at who coaches the 2017 Masters champion, Sergio Garcia.

Who Is Sergio Garcia’s Coach?

Thomas Bjorn shocked many when he selected Sergio Garcia as one of his wildcard picks for the upcoming Ryder Cup at Le Golf National. Garcia will bring unquestionable experience to the team however he has been struggling for form all year and will have to call on his entire team to get him back on track. Below we take a look at who coaches the mercurial Spaniard.

Who Is Sergio Garcia’s Coach?

It is not clear who his coach is right now, but over the years he has worked with Pete Cowen before.

Cowen has coached some extremely prolific players including Lee Westwood, Thomas Bjorn, Darren Clarke, Henrik Stenson, Louis Oosthuizen, Thomas Pieters, and Matthew Fitzpatrick. But when it comes to ball striking, Cowen acknowledges that Garcia is one of the finest ball-strikers he has ever seen due to his shoulder movement.

Peter Cowen standing with Sergio and caddie Glen Murray (Getty Images)

“Sergio lays the shaft down on the downswing far more than anyone, myself included, would recommend. But the way he delivers the club into the ball through the movement of his shoulders is fantastic. When I work with Sergio, I’m never tempted to touch the way he flattens the shaft, because the movement of his shoulders is so good. Remember, the swing isn’t about positions, it’s how you move from one position to the next. Billy Foster, who has caddied for Lee Westwood, Darren Clarke, Seve Ballesteros, Sergio and even Tiger, will tell you that Sergio is the best striker of the lot. It’s the way Sergio moves those shoulders that makes Billy’s observation spot on.”

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Additionally, Sergio has also taken considerable guidance from his father, Victor. A former pro himself. Victor introduced Sergio to the game when he was three-years-old and has coached him for a significant number of years.

When asked whether it was difficult to manage the relationship of his father being his coach as well, Sergio responded; “Yes for sure. There were times when it was tough especially when I was younger because it is difficult to differentiate where the coach starts and the father finishes.”

After his Masters win in 2017, it was his father who he recognised as his most important influence to the extent that Sergio bought Club de Campo del Mediterráneo for his father. This was the club where he had honed his skills and his father had worked for over 40 years, and when it hit financial trouble, Sergio gifted the course to his father.

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