It will go down as one of the best Masters in history. Here were five big stories from the week...

5 Biggest Stories From The 2019 Masters

Tiger Woods won his fifth Masters title and 15th Major at The Masters and it will go down as one of the best tournaments in Augusta history.

The 43-year-old’s victory was the the biggest story of the year and, of course, by far the biggest story of the week, but there were plenty of others too.

Below, we look at the five biggest stories from the 2019 Masters –

Tiger Woods and Major number 15

Things You Didn't Know About Tiger Woods

The 43-year-old produced one of the greatest comebacks in the history of sport.

From not even being able to walk two years prior after a fourth back surgery, the American surged back to the top of the golfing world.

Having been written off for years, Woods captured his 15th Major in stunning fashion on what will go down as one of the greatest Masters Sundays ever seen.

From 1997 when his father Earl was there to greet him on the 18th green, it went full circle with Woods hugging his children after the winning putt dropped.

Woods returned to the world’s top 10 with his Green Jacket victory and it gave us hope that there is a Major-winning future ahead. Exciting times for golf and sports fans.

Related: Tiger Woods’ 15th Major by the numbers

Francesco Molinari’s Augusta meltdown

Just like at the 2018 Open and Ryder Cup, Francesco Molinari was a machine for the first 63 holes but what followed can only be described as a Masters meltdown.

The Italian went 50 holes without a bogey during the week and had made 18/18 scrambles through 60 holes, however it all went wrong on the back nine.

It was hard to watch as he threw away the chance of a first Green Jacket and second Major by going into the water twice on 12 and 15 to make two double bogeys.

Of all the golfers to ‘choke’, we didn’t think it would be him after a phenomenal 2018 where he closed out the BMW PGA Championship, Open Championship, Quicken Loans National and Ryder Cup in style plus the 2019 Arnold Palmer Invitational.

Since then, he has failed to record a single top-10 in 18 starts and has seen his world ranking drop from 7th to 26th.

Related: How Molinari’s Augusta challenge fell apart spectacularly

Justin Rose missing his first ever Masters cut

Runner-up in 2015 and 2017, Justin Rose came into Augusta as the World Number One and was one of the favourites to win his first Green Jacket.

What transpired was surprising, as the Englishman missed his first ever cut at The Masters.

If there was any top player at Augusta that week we thought would 100% finish in the top-10, it was Rose!

He has placed inside the top-20 nine times at The Masters including two runners-up finishes.

Could he win it this year? He is certainly due a turnaround in form having seen his world ranking drop from 2nd at Augusta last year to 13th currently.

Rory McIlroy failing to live up to expectations

Rory was the tournament favourite at 7/1 as he attempted to complete the career grand slam.

He came into the week in excellent form after his Players Championship victory and was positive after work with a performance coach, the introduction of meditation and his new found passion for reading books.

It looked like we were about to see a new Rory, although that did not quite transpire.

Similarly to Rose, he simply didn’t have his best stuff but did make the cut at level par.

His best round of the week came in the final round with a 68 to reach five under and finish T21st, however it is the first time since 2013 that he hasn’t been inside the top-10 at Augusta.

We don’t have to wait very long to see if he can capture the career slam.

Related: The wait for a Green Jacket continues for Rory McIlroy

Viktor Hovland

2018 US Amateur champion Viktor Hovland won the Silver Cup with a seriously impressive display, finishing at three under and T32nd, one ahead of Latin America Amateur Champion Alvaro Ortiz.

He joined the likes of Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, Matt Kuchar, Ryan Moore and Bryson DeChambeau as recent winners of the US Amateur and Masters Silver Cup.

The Oslo-native then finished in a tie for 12th at the US Open with a total of 280, the lowest score ever recorded by an amateur in the tournament’s 119-year history, beating Jack Nicklaus’ 282 total from 1960.

Since then he has turned pro, earned a PGA Tour card, broke the record for the most consecutive rounds in the 60s on the PGA Tour and won his first PGA Tour title.

He is now well within a shout of making his Ryder Cup debut later this year.

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