Titleist T-Series Irons First Hit Review

Ever since the Tour seeding process began I’ve been keen to get my hands on the new Titleist T-Series and 620 irons and I finally got that chance on the Monday of Irish Open week at the stunning Adare Manor.

Across the five models, every visual preference and ability is catered for and there are distinct differences between them all that can guide you into the best model for your game.

Titleist T-series-outdoor-web

Starting with the T100, the 718 AP2 replacement. This is played on tour by the likes of Jordan Spieth but will be a popular choice for the low handicap golfer too. It looks more like a CB model at address thanks to the thinner top edge, but has the forgiveness on offer to rescue a poor strike. It feels solid and soft and the extra camber on the sole helps it glide through the turf a little more easily. With the 7-iron at 34°, it maintains its traditional lofts to ensure you won’t hit it too far.

A nice touch on all the new irons is the loft of the pitching wedge within the set being written on the sole. This helps you gap your wedges appropriately and stops you having to scroll through the Titleist website searching for it.

Titleist T-series-PW-lofts-web

The T200 replaces the popular AP3 model and has similar hallmarks – a touch more offset and stronger lofts (the 7-iron is 30°) than the T100 to provide additional distance for those that need it. Again, it’s a little more compact but it hasn’t lost any of its firepower.

In fact, you’ll likely see a distance gain with T200 over AP3 without sacrificing trajectory, so the new technology inside the head is clearly doing its job. Was I surprised this wasn’t a hollow-headed, blade-looking iron? A little, given the current trend, but it still performed admirably.

If it’s out and out distance you crave, the T300 is your model of choice. It still looks like a classic, Titleist iron, but underneath the hood is a design that will leave you gagging to hit another ball.

Off the face, it feels springy like a metalwood, but still sounds like an iron should. It has the strongest loft (the 7-iron is 29°) but I only hit it a few feet lower than the T200. Along with the fastest ball speeds, it does also produce the lowest spin resulting in exceptional carry distances that were surprisingly consistent on slight mishits.

T series iron data new copy

You can see the fairly even distance gaps I experienced between the three models when testing with the same Project X 6.0 shaft.

The 620 CB and MB models weren’t as long as any of the T-Series irons, but they certainly offered a softer feel, more workability and slimmer, more traditional looks at address. The MB is arguably the best looking of them all, but as a true one-piece forged muscleback, it was annoyingly the most difficult to hit.

I struck the mid and short irons in the CB well but struggled to flight the long irons. This is where I and many golfers could and probably should consider a mixed set, with the T100 in the 4- and 5-iron for a little extra assistance when it comes to launch and forgiveness and then transition into the 620 CB model for feel and precision on the mid and short irons.

In summary, I would say that both visually and from a performance perspective, the T-Series and the 620 irons to a degree, represent a step up from the 718 range that should certainly bring them to the forefront of the mind of any golfer looking to upgrade their iron set in 2019 and beyond.